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Portable Studio

It has been a nice busy start to 2012 where I’ve mainly been photographing families and beautiful pregnant women. I thought I’d write a blog for those of you who want to know how a photo session works at a clients home.

What does a portable studio look like?

Whether you’re interested in photography or wondering how a portable photo session works.

My portable studio set up has been recently revamped with new backgrounds and a smoother Lastolite background support set. The investment was well worth it as I noticed how the updated support has evolved in technology since my last one, making life easier for me as a photographer.

How much space will it take up?

The size of the space of the studio largely depends on the available space of the client’s home. The standard sizes for a backdrop frame tends to go as wide as three meters, narrowing to half that size. Three meters can comfortably fit a family of five, more at a squeeze but watch out for the edges! At it’s minimal width I wouldn’t usually photograph more than two people. The more background space you have the more freedom you have to play.

If you have a choice of space do bear in mind where you will be plugging your lights in and how you will be lighting your subjects.

Setting up a home studio for clients

Setting up a home studio

Before I set up my space, I decide on what style I am looking for, I use a dark background to create an arty, dramatic feel, or a white background to give a clean strong feel that makes the subject pop. If the session time permits I use both!

How long does it take to set up?

People are often amazed at how their home can transform into a photographic studio in about twenty minutes, I’ve timed myself on my set ups and unless I get interrupted for a chat, that’s all it takes.

It’s key to ensure that any wires are well out of the way, taped down if possible. I use a wireless system to synchronise the lights which is highly useful.

Here’s my assistant and model especially for this blog.

Home Studio set up

Home Studio set up

The space looks impressive and most importantly, it gets results!

 

Here’s a few more home studio shots…

Portrait session

When the session’s finished I pack up the backdrop area first to allow my lights to cool down. I would give two hours for a portrait session, which should give plenty of time to capture your subjects nicely.

Happy snapping 😉

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  • Thanks I did wonder what it all entailed!